RippleBuds Noise Blocking Earbuds Fitted With In-Ear Mic

RippleBuds Noise Blocking Earbuds Fitted With In-Ear Mic

Team RippleBuds have created a new range of noise blocking earbuds, aptly named RippleBuds, which are also fitted with an in ear microphone and have been specifically designed to exclude ambient noise so your voice is always crystal clear.

The RippleBuds Bluetooth earbuds have been launched over Kickstarter crowdfunding website this week and already close to passing the $50,000 protocol within the first few days.

Watch the promotional video below to learn more about the RippleBuds earbuds and their unique features and functionality. The earbuds also come complete with their own compact and portable charging dock and carry case.

RippleBuds captures the human voice from the ear allowing your voice to be heard clearly even when you’re in an extremely noisy environment. RippleBuds’ Noise Blocking Technology reduces ambient noise to about 30 decibels. RippleBuds has a great competitive edge when it comes to strepitous environments. Our Noise Blocking Technology physically intercepts ambient noise due to the non-traditional positioning of the RippleBuds in-ear microphone.

For more information on the new RippleBuds jump over to the Kickstarter website for details and to make a pledge from just $69 to be one of the very first to own these unique in-ear earbuds.

(http://www.geeky-gadgets.com/ripplebuds-noise-blocking-earbuds-fitted-with-in-ear-mic-22-03-2016/)

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Wireless earphones put a microphone in your ear

Wireless earphones put a microphone in your ear

Toward the end of last year, the first truly wireless earphones became available for consumers to buy and plug in. We were sent a pair of Earins to review and were impressed by both performance and build quality, though found them a little on the quiet side. Taking calls while using them was also a bit of a hassle, as they didn’t feature a built-in microphone. The RippleBuds project supports hands-free calling with the inclusion of an in-ear microphone, while also promising increased play time.

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The development of the Earin wireless earphones was inspired by the sight of actor Ryan Reynolds popping in a pair of cable-free buds during the opening sequence of the movieDefinitely Maybe and going walkabout to the beat of “the other perfect song.”

Though the first out of the Bluetooth starting blocks, similar projects soon followed. The bulbous-by-comparison Dash plugs (which are shown as available for purchase on the Bragi webstore) include an “an ear bone microphone” that facilitates bone conduction for speech, while the smaller Dot earphones (which moved from Kickstarter to Indiegogo and, at the time of writing, has yet to ship units to backers) is reported to include a microphone on both earbuds.

In development since 2012, and now the subject of over a hundred registered or pending patents in nine countries, the RippleBuds are said to be capable of capturing a user’s actual voice while also minimizing background noise. The positioning of the custom condenser microphone just inside the ear canal is claimed to reduce ambient noise to a library quiet 30 dB, with patented technology also preventing echo and howling despite the speaker driver and microphone being close together.

The earphones will also come with five sizes of sweat-proof silicone tips, which are rippled (hence the name) to help reduce noise from the outside world and for a secure fit. The tips are also washable, which is probably just as well given the amount of ear wax those ridges are likely to trap.

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Each 17.4 x 26.5 mm (0.6 x 1 in), 4.5 g (0.16 oz) capsule is expected to include a 55 mAh Li-ion battery for up to 5 hours of music playback or talktime between charges, though as with the Earins, the charging pod can be used to extend mobile music listening. The developers say that the charging case will offer three full top ups of both RippleBud capsules before its own battery needs charging.

The RippleBuds pair with a compatible smartphone or tablet over Bluetooth 4.1 for about 30 ft (10 m) of wireless range, and users will be able to take calls using voice commands for hands-free comms or flowing conversations with a smart digital assistant. Notifications will also be sent out if the RippleBuds get too far away from a paired smartphone, helping minimize accidental loss.

The RippleBuds will come in mono or stereo packages, though it won’t be possible for users to listen to stereo music using two mono units. To get working prototype into production, the development team has turned to Kickstarter. At the time of writing, pledges for a mono RippleBud start at US$69, the stereo RippleBuds starting at $99. If all goes to plan, shipping is estimated to start in September.

(http://www.gizmag.com/ripplebuds-bluetooth-earphones/42419/)

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This headset puts a microphone right in your ear canal

This headset puts a microphone right in your ear canal

It’s been a while since I’ve cared about advances in Bluetooth headsets, and I would guess that I’m not alone. For years, you’ve been able to buy a small and decent-enough earpiece for taking calls hands-free, and most people are probably happy enough to use their EarPods for that purpose. That’s why I was surprised to be impressed with the oddly named RippleBuds: They’re a lot better at reducing background noise than your average Bluetooth headset.

Visually, RippleBuds (which can be purchased either as a single mono earpiece or a stereo pair) look like any other wireless Bluetooth earbuds out there. The trick here is that there isn’t an external microphone that can pick up all kinds of extraneous noise in addition to your voice. Instead, RippleBuds picks up sound waves that come out of your ear as you speak using a tiny microphone embedded in the earpiece itself. The design of the RippleBud blocks exterior noise so that all the mic picks up is your voice.

I didn’t get to try RippleBuds directly, but the company’s CMO, Severus Kim, gave me a quick demo that did a good job of illustrating how they compare to a standard Bluetooth headset. He sat in a room by himself and called me using a basic headset while a speaker blasted loud ambient noise. Naturally, the mic picked up everything in the room, and I could barely hear a word he said. Doing the same test with RippleBuds was a completely different experience. I could hear everything he said despite the background racket. It sounded like Kim was in a totally quiet room, even though the speaker continued to blast noise: I was standing right outside the room where Kim was sitting and could confirm that he kept the audio going throughout the demo.

RippleBuds says the earbuds will offer about five hours of talk time when fully charged, but I’m not sure how that changes if you’re playing music. Both the mono and stereo earbuds come with a neat case that has a built-in battery for charging them up; the case itself will recharge a single mono earbud up to six times or the stereo pair three times. The case itself can be recharged with a USB cable. It’s a clever design: As long as the case has some juice, you shouldn’t be left with completely dead headphones often.

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The demo was impressive, but RippleBuds aren’t exactly cheap: The suggested retail price for a mono headphone is $129 while a stereo pair runs for $179. However, you can get them for a lot less on Kickstarter right now; orders are expected to ship by June. I don’t need one enough to justify the current $69 entry price for a mono earbud, but if you talk on the phone hands-free a lot, it might be worth looking into.

(https://www.engadget.com/2016/03/23/this-headset-puts-a-microphone-right-in-your-ear-canal/)

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